APTA is an open space for the development and exchange of political theory ideas to overcome the challenges facing Africa today.It aims to sustain and expand the discussions of political theory and develop a programme of action beyond the Theoria journal and the Political Theory Summer School which was held at the University of Fort Hare in 2018.

The objectives of APTA include:

• To promote the importance of political theory in Africa

• To enhance debate, research and teaching in political theory

• To nurture young political theorists and enable publishing opportunities

• To expand networks continentally and globally

• To encourage the use of political theory in public debate and practical politics

APTA will host its first Annual General Meeting in the summer of 2019/2020. The interim acting directors include:

Lawrence Hamilton:
cvnov18.doc

Lawrence Hamilton is Professor of Political Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits). He holds the SARChI/Newton SA-UK Bilateral Research Chair in Political Theory, Wits and Cambridge, where he teaches and researches on various topics in political theory, South African politics and the history of political and economic thought. He contributes to rethinking political theory from the perspective of the global South around five main themes: needs, interests and rights; freedom, resistance and democracy; states, markets and political judgement; the ethics and economics of Amartya Sen; and decolonizing republics. He has held visiting positions in Salvador, Caracas, Cape Town and Cambridge, is an elected member of the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) and is editor-in-chief of Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory. His many articles and books include Amartya Sen (Polity 2019), Freedom is Power: Liberty Through Political Representation (Cambridge University Press 2014), Are South Africans Free? (Bloomsbury 2014) and The Political Philosophy of Needs (Cambridge University Press 2003). He is currently working on another book: Human Needs, Human Rights and Political Judgement. He directs APTA and the Witwatersrand-Cambridge Exchange Programme, and is the recipient of over twelve awards for research excellence. He is the only political scientist ever to receive an A-rating from the South African National Research Foundation (NRF).

Bernard Matolino:

Bernard Matolino is an associate professor in philosophy at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg campus. His research interests are mainly in African philosophy and race and racism. He has supervised to completion seven Masters and six PhD candidates. He has authored over 30 peer reviewed book chapters and journal articles. He has three monographs to his name: Personhood in African Philosophy (2014); Consensus as Democracy in Africa (2018) and Afro-Communitarian Democracy (forthcoming Lexington (2019)).

Laurence Piper:
cv_25_october_2018.pdf

Laurence Piper is a Political Scientist at the University of the Western Cape interested in urban governance, democracy, state-society relations and citizenship in South Africa and comparatively. His latest book is ‘Democracy Disconnected: Participation and Governance in a City of the South’ , Routledge, 2018, with Dr Fiona Anciano. He is the previous President of the South African Association of Political Studies (SAAPS) 2016-8.